University Bulletin 2017-2018

Philosophy

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Course Listings

  • PHL 110
    Introduction to Philosophy
    3 cr

    An introduction to philosophical analysis and criticism through a survey of the major branches of philosophy. Topics may include, but are not limited to: the mind/body problem, theory of knowledge, skepticism, ethics, political philosophy, aesthetics, and philosophy of religion. Fulfills the General Education Requirement.

  • PHL 120
    Critical Thinking
    3 cr

    This course will examine complex types of reasoning, including statistical judgment, decision making, and causal and analogical thinking. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of concrete examples of reasoning in various fields, including science, religion and theology, politics, law as well as alternative medicine and other non-traditional disciplines. Students will be encouraged to improve their own judgment and decision making by learning how to evaluate arguments and by learning about fallacies, common errors and biases in reasoning and decision making. There will also be extensive discussion on the relation between how people do reason and how they ought to reason. Fulfils the General Education Requirement.

  • PHL 121
    Introduction to Logic
    3 cr

    Studies arguments: what they are, how to identify them, and how to judge their quality; and examines inductive and deductive arguments in both their informal and formal aspects. Fulfills the General Education Requirement. MA 110 or equivalent is recommended.

  • PHL 131
    Introduction to Ethics
    3 cr

    Examines ideas about good and bad, right and wrong, and moral obligation through a survey of major ethical systems in western philosophy. The course includes consideration of how these ideas apply to moral problems and issues. Fulfills the General Education Requirement.

  • PHL 231
    Social Ethics
    3 cr

    Readings and analyses of ethical issues in society. Topics may include euthanasia, sexual equality, sexual morality, censorship, world hunger, animal rights, the environment, and capital punishment. Fulfills the General Education Requirement.

  • PHL 240
    Western Philosophy: Classical
    3 cr

    Survey of classical Greek philosophy. The philosophers surveyed may include Presocratic philosophers, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and Hellenistic philosophers. Fulfills the General Education Requirement. Identical with CLA 240. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 240 and CLA 240.

  • PHL 242
    Western Philosophy - Medieval
    3 cr

    A survey of Medieval Western Latin, Jewish and Islamic philosophers. Identical with REL 242. Credit cannot be received for both REL 242 and PHL 242.

  • PHL 245
    Renaissance-Enlightnmnt - W
    3 cr

    Survey of Western philosophy from F. Bacon to Kant with emphasis on the empiricists, rationalists, and Kant.

    Pre-requisite: (EH 102 Minimum Grade of C or EH 105 Minimum Grade of C)
  • PHL 251
    Philosophy and Cognitive Sci
    3 cr

    A survey of central concepts and issues in cognitive science, including an informal introduction to automata theory, intelligent systems architecture, and the philosophical issues arising out of computational models of language and cognition.

  • PHL 290
    Special Topics -
    1 TO 3 cr

    Different themes and issues of philosophical significance will be studied as announced. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

  • PHL 301
    Skepticism in Media-Philosophy
    3 cr

    This course examines some of the most fundamental questions about human knowledge, belief and rationality and compares the treatment of such issues in philosophical discussions and contemporary media, especially film. Identical with CA 301. Credit cannot be received for both CA 301 and PHL 301.

    Pre-requisite: EH 102 Minimum Grade of D or EH 105 Minimum Grade of D
  • PHL 310
    Classical Mythology
    3 cr

    Through the disciplines of English and Philosophy, this course will provide an introduction to myths and to the literature that recounts the myths, legends, and folktales of ancient Greece and Rome. This course will also look at how different writers treat the material and why their treatments vary. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 310 and either EH 310 or REL 310 or CLA 310.

    Pre-requisite: ACT English 27( or SAT Critical Reading 550 or University - EH101 Exempt P or EH 101 Minimum Grade of C or EH 110 Minimum Grade of D or EH 190 Minimum Grade of D or USA 010 Minimum Grade of S) and (EH 102 Minimum Grade of C or EH 105 Minimum Grade of C)
  • PHL 311
    Political Philosophy I
    3 cr

    An examination of the central themes of classical Western political philosophy through the reading and discussing of the primary works of such thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas. Cross-listed as PSC 311 and CLA 311. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 311 and either PSC 311 or CLA 311.

  • PHL 312
    Political Philosophy II
    3 cr

    An examination of the central themes of classical Western political philosophy through the reading and discussing of the primary works of such thinkers as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Cross-listed as PSC 312. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 312 and PSC 312.

    Pre-requisite: PSC 130 Minimum Grade of C
  • PHL 313
    Political Philosophy III - W
    3 cr

    An examination of the central themes of classical Western political philosophy through the reading and discussing of the primary works of such thinkers as Hegel, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. Cross-listed as PSC 313. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 313 and PSC 313.

    Pre-requisite: PSC 130 Minimum Grade of C
  • PHL 321
    Symbolic Logic
    3 cr

    A study of sentential and predicate logics and related topics.

  • PHL 327
    Philosophy of Science
    3 cr

    Studies such topics as method and explanation in the sciences; the demarcation between science and pseudoscience; realist and anti-realist views about scientific theories; the logic of scientific change; confirmation; reduction; laws of nature; underdetermination; and society, science, and values.

  • PHL 331
    Alienation
    3 cr

    Alienation, a fundamental element in human existence, is analyzed in the philosophy of Marx, Hegel, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche and Sartre, and then used to interpret characters and situations in selected novels and films.

  • PHL 333
    Biomedical Ethics - W
    3 cr

    Ethical analyses of problems and issues in the biomedical and health-related fields. Topics may include genetic research and technology, abortion, health care, experimentation, and death and dying.

    Pre-requisite: (EH 102 Minimum Grade of C or EH 105 Minimum Grade of C)
  • PHL 334
    Man and Technology
    3 cr

    Examines the most common impacts that technology is envisioned to have on both the spirit of the human person and the environment in which that person lives. Both the technologist and anti-technologist arguments will be explored.

  • PHL 336
    Legal Theory
    3 cr

    Explores theoretical issues and problems in the area of law, including theories about the nature of law, legal validity, the relation between morality and law, and our obligation to obey the law. Specific problems, such as legal moralism, are also examined. Cross-listed as CJ 336. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 336 and CJ 336.

  • PHL 337
    Liability and Punishment
    3 cr

    Explores theoretical issues and problems in the areas of law (especially criminal law) concerning liability and punishment. Topics to be examined include diminished capacity, theories of punishment, and capital punishment. Cross-listed as CJ 337. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 337 and CJ 337.

  • PHL 339
    Philosophy of Culture
    3 cr

    Acquaints students with Cassirer's philosophy of culture, with emphasis on the unity of human experience as ramified into myth, language, religion, art, history, science, and politico-social life.

  • PHL 345
    Post-Kant Anglo-American
    3 cr

    An examination of selected themes and issues in Anglo- American philosophy since 1800. Topics may include pragmatism, ideal language philosophy, and ordinary language philosophy.

    Pre-requisite: PHL 121 Minimum Grade of C or (PHL 321 Minimum Grade of C or PHL 324 Minimum Grade of C)
  • PHL 348
    19th C Contl Phl-Lit Theory
    3 cr

    An examination of selected themes and issues in 19th Century Continental Philosophy and Literary Theory. Topics may include Idealism, Romanticism, Existentialism, Marxism, Freudianism. Identical with EG 348 and LG 348. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 348 and either EH 348 or LG 348. (For LG credit, students will be required to do some coursework in their language of concentration.)

  • PHL 349
    20th C Cntl Phl-Lit Theory
    3 cr

    An examination of selected themes and issues in 20th Century Continental Philosophy and Literary theory. Topics may include Phenomenology, Existentialism, Hermeneutics, Structuralism, and Post-Structuralism. Identical with EH 349. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 349 and either EH 349 or LG 349. (For LG credit, students will be required to do some coursework in their language of concentration.)

  • PHL 351
    Philosophy of Religion - W
    3 cr

    Investigates the nature of religion, including religious experience, religious language, arguments for the existence of God, and the problems of evil. Identical with REL 351. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 351 and REL 351.

    Pre-requisite: (EH 102 Minimum Grade of C or EH 105 Minimum Grade of C)
  • PHL 352
    World Religions
    3 cr

    This course is an introduction to the religions of the world. It is divided into three basic units: Indigenous Religions (of Africa, North America, and Oceania); Eastern Religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, Jainism) and Western Religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam). The emphasis is on grasping the core principles of each tradition, seeing the ways in which religion meets basic human needs, and religion as a cultural artifact that borrows, adapts, and changes over time. Course is identical with REL 352 and SY 352. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 352 and REL 352 or SY 352.

  • PHL 354
    Philosophies of India
    3 cr

    Introduces the major religions and philosophies of India by way of the classical Realist/Anti-Realist debate in India. Study of the major religious doctrines of theistic and non-dualist Vedanta, Buddhism, and Jainism, and their philosophical articulation in the Nyaya, Advaita Vedanta, Madhyamaka, and other schools. Identical with REL 354. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 354 and REL 354.

  • PHL 355
    Chinese Philosophy
    3 cr

    Introduces the major classical religious and philosophical systems of China by way of an examination of early Confucianism, Mohism, Yangism, Legalism, Taoism, and Chinese Buddhism. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the role of these schools in the development of Chinese religion, morality, and political organization. Identical with REL 355. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 355 and REL 355.

  • PHL 361
    Philosophy of Mind
    3 cr

    A study of the concept of consciousness and related concepts (e.g., mind, self, thinking) as applied to man, other animals, non-terrestrials, and machines.

  • PHL 370
    Philosophy of Art
    3 cr

    Acquaints students with main issues in aesthetics. Includes such issues as the nature and function of art and the criteria of aesthetic judgment. Identical with ARH 370. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 370 and ARH 370.

  • PHL 390
    Special Topics -
    1 TO 3 cr

    Different figures or topics of philosophical significance will be studied as announced. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

  • PHL 421
    Literary Criticism to 1900 - W
    3 cr

    Classical, Neoclassical, Romantic, and Victorian literary theory. Identical with EH 421. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 421 and EH 421.

    Pre-requisite: (EH 102 Minimum Grade of C or EH 105 Minimum Grade of C)
  • PHL 422
    Literary Criticism Sn 1900 - W
    3 cr

    Modern and Contemporary Literary Theory. Identical with EH 422.

    Pre-requisite: (EH 102 Minimum Grade of C or EH 105 Minimum Grade of C)
  • PHL 431
    Advanced Ethical Theory
    3 cr

    Problems in traditional and recent value theory and ethics.

  • PHL 441
    Theory of Knowledge
    3 cr

    Examines knowledge, its scope and limits. Topics may include the conditions, criteria, and grounds for knowledge, and theories of truth and meaning.

    Pre-requisite: PHL 110 Minimum Grade of C or PHL 121 Minimum Grade of C
  • PHL 461
    Metaphysics - W
    3 cr

    Studies philosophical theories about the nature of reality, including such topics as what is real, change, the nature of things, universals, and such views as monism, materialism, realism, and idealism. Capstone course for all philosophy concentrations.

    Pre-requisite: (PHL 240 Minimum Grade of C or CLA 240 Minimum Grade of C or PHL 241 Minimum Grade of C) and (PHL 243 Minimum Grade of C or PHL 245 Minimum Grade of C) and (PHL 321 Minimum Grade of C or PHL 324 Minimum Grade of C)
  • PHL 467
    Mathematical Logic
    3 cr

    An introduction to formal first-order logic, first-order metatheory, and its extensions. Topics include axiom systems and their models, completeness, compactness, and recursive sets and functions. Identical with MA 467. Credit cannot be received for both PHL 467 and MA 467.

    Pre-requisite: (PHL 321 Minimum Grade of C or PHL 324 Minimum Grade of C) or MA 311 Minimum Grade of C or MA 316 Minimum Grade of C or MA 318 Minimum Grade of C or MA 320 Minimum Grade of C or MA 321 Minimum Grade of C or MA 332 Minimum Grade of C or MA 334 Minimum Grade of C or MA 335 Minimum Grade of C or MA 354 Minimum Grade of C or MA 367 Minimum Grade of C or MA 410 Minimum Grade of C or MA 413 Minimum Grade of C or MA 414 Minimum Grade of C or MA 434 Minimum Grade of C or MA 436 Minimum Grade of C or MA 437 Minimum Grade of C or MA 451 Minimum Grade of C or MA 458 Minimum Grade of C or MA 490 Minimum Grade of C or MA 537 Minimum Grade of C or MA 542 Minimum Grade of C or MA 550 Minimum Grade of C
  • PHL 490
    Special Topics -
    3 cr

    An investigation of issues and concepts in philosophy for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. May be repeated, when content varies, for a total of six hours. Prerequisites: junior, senior, or graduate standing.

  • PHL 492
    Seminar -
    1 TO 3 cr

    An investigation of issues and concepts in philosophy for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. May be repeated, when content varies, for a total of 6 hours.

  • PHL 494
    Directed Studies -
    1 TO 3 cr

    Directed research in philosophy under the guidance of a member of the department. Credit according to the magnitude of the individual project. May be repeated, if content varies, for a total of 6 hours. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and approval of directing professor and department chair. Prerequisites: Junior, senior, or graduate standing.

  • PHL 499
    Honors Thesis - H (W)
    3 TO 6 cr

    Extended research paper prepared under direction of thesis advisor plus two-person committee selected by advisor in consultation with student. Prerequisites: The student must have developed a proposal for the thesis in consultation with the advisor, and received permission for the work from the committee. In addition, the student must be a senior major or minor, have completed the logic and history of philosophy requirements, have at least two courses at the 300-level or higher, and have at least a 3.3 GPA in the Philosophy Concentration of the Philosophy major. Credit for this course is only given as an addition to the hours required for the major.

  • PHL 590
    Special Topics -
    1 TO 3 cr

    Study of individuals or topics of philosophical significance. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Enrollment is limited to students in disciplines other than philosophy. May be repeated, if content varies, for a total of 6 hours.

  • PHL 594
    Directed Studies
    3 cr

    Directed research in philosophy under the guidance of a member of the department. May be repeated, if content varies, for a total of six hours. Prerequisite: Graduate Student in Department conferring a Graduate Degree (hence not open to Philosophy majors in any Concentration in Philosophy).