University Bulletin 2017-2018

Print Bulletin Page

Computer Science (BS)

Computer Science (BS) Course Title Credit Hours
Requirements: Fifty-one (51) credit hours, with a minimum grade of "C" in each course, are required as follows 51
CA 275 3 hrs Small Group Discussion  
EH 372 3 hrs Technical Writing (W)  
CSC 108 3 hrs Introduction to Computer Science  
CSC 120 4 hrs Problem Solving and Programming Concepts  
CSC 228 3 hrs Digital Logic and Comp Architecture  
CSC 231 4 hrs Introduction to Data Structures and Algorithms  
CIS 300 1 hr Information Technology in Society  
CSC 311 3 hrs Networking and Communications  
CSC 320 3 hrs Computer Organization and Architecture  
CSC 322 3 hrs Operating Systems  
CSC 331 3 hrs Software Engineering Principles (W)  
CSC 332 3 hrs Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms  
CSC 333 3 hrs Program Language Theory  
CSC 399 3 hrs Concurrency and Distributed Computing  
CSC 440 3 hrs Secure Software Engineering  
CSC 434 3 hrs Formal Language and Automata Theory  
CIS 497 3 hrs Senior Project (W)  
CIS 498 0 hrs Senior Seminar  
Computer Science Electives - Twelve (12) credit hours, with a minimum grade of "C" in each course, are required. Select any four (4) of the following courses: 12
CSC 410 3 hrs Compiler Design & Construction  
CSC 412 3 hrs  Real-Time Systems  
CSC 413 3 hrs Computer Graphics  
CSC 416 3 hrs Artificial Intelligence Theory and Programming  
CSC 417  3 hrs Game Development   
CSC 418 3 hrs Advanced Game Development  
CSC 428 3 hrs Introduction to Bioinformatics  
CIS 324 3 hrs Database Concepts  
CIS 494 3 hs Directed Study  
CSC 457 3 hrs Data Warehousing  
CSC 490 3 hrs Computer Science Special Topics  
Computer Science General Studies Electives - Hours as needed to meet degree and 125 semester hour requirement. All General Studies Electives must be approved by the Computer Science Coordinator.
Department of Computer Science Staff  
Associate Professor & Computer Science Chair Dr. Tom Johnsten

Computer Science is a discipline that involves the understanding and design of computers and computational processes. In its most general form, it is concerned with the understanding of information transfer and transformation. Particular interest is placed on making processes efficient and endowing them with some form of intelligence. The discipline includes both advancing the fundamental understanding of algorithms and information processes in general, as well as the practical design of efficient, reliable software to meet given specifications. Courses offer students the opportunity to explore current trends in computing such as:  information assurance, big data, video game development, computer graphics and robotics.