English Course Offerings

The English Department's course offerings vary by semester. We offer 100-level composition courses, 200-level introductory courses, 300-level intermediate courses, 400-level advanced courses, and 500-level graduate courses. For a listing of everything in the departmental catalog, please visit:

http://www.southalabama.edu/bulletin/coureh.htm

For a listing of courses offered in a given semester, please visit PAWS. Enter the catalog term you wish to search and select "English" as the subject on the following page.


Spring 2015 Undergraduate Course Offerings (More Coming Soon!)


Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances / EH 322 | Richard Hillyer
We will read a representative selection of plays in these two genres. Assignments: midterm, final, two short research papers.


Teaching Composition / EH 401 | Annmarie Guzy
This course will introduce you to theories of composition and their applications for teaching writing at the secondary school level. In a seminar-style format, you will:

  • learn a variety of pedagogical strategies from the required textbooks;
  • become familiar with the requirements for middle school and high school Language Arts classes as mandated by the Alabama Course of Study;
  • select and lead discussions of articles from English Journal, the NCTE’s publication for secondary English teachers;
  • teach a 50-minute class on an assigned topic in language arts; and
  • design a syllabus or detailed academic unit for a middle school or high school English class, and support it with a research-based rationale.

Rhetoric: Ancient and Modern / EH 402 | Nicole Amare
This course is designed for individuals who want a better understanding of the history of rhetoric, particularly rhetoric in the Western World.  Rhetoric is often a controversial topic at best, and it is helpful to trace why rhetoric is sometimes given a bad rap in our modern day.  We will study the fundamentals of rhetoric, beginning with the Greeks.  After examining and discussing characteristics, subject matter, and topoi of Classical Rhetoric, we will move swiftly through Medieval, Renaissance, and Enlightenment Rhetoric before grounding ourselves more firmly in the rhetorical traditions of more recent historical time periods.   This method will allow us adequate sampling and understanding of basic rhetorical moves and their conditions that will help us better consume, critique, and produce effective modern and postmodern rhetoric. 


19th-Century Literature / EH 475 | Ellen Burton Harrington
The prolific periodical culture of the Victorian period produced a rich array of novels and stories, from the lengthy three‑deckers that Henry James famously called “loose, baggy monsters” to the more succinct novels of the end of the century. This class will consider a variety of novels and short stories, both popular and literary, that represent some of the significant political, social, racial, national, and gender undercurrents of the Victorian and Edwardian periods, along with historical and critical work that contextualizes it. We will begin with Charles Dickens’s Oliver Twist (1838), considering the novel’s classic portrayal of the orphan hero grappling with issues like class and crime. We’ll move to Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights (1847), reading the novel as a threshold text between the Romantic and the Victorian periods, and then we will examine George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss (1860) through its presentation of childhood and Victorian womanhood. Next, we will read Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone (1868) and consider class, crime, the critique of empire, and developing genres of popular fiction. We will read Stevenson’s novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) and consider crime and the city, developing theories of the mind, manhood, and the implications of Darwin. We will move to Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles (1891) to examine the tragic limitations of Tess’s class and gender positioning. Joseph Conrad’s Edwardian novel The Secret Agent (1906) is another threshold text, treating topical issues like anarchism and women’s rights in a novel that crosses genres, merging the political novel with the domestic novel and the detective novel.


Spring 2015 Graduate Course Offerings (More Coming Soon!)


Sex and Science in Early Modern England / EH 525 | Richard Hillyer
Students will develop a research paper through several drafts based on these themes and readings by John Aubrey, Aphra Behn, Abraham Cowley, Samuel Pepys, Alexander Pope, the Earl of Rochester, Thomas Shadwell, Jonathan Swift, James Thomson, and others.


Victorian & Edwardian Prose / EH 538 | Ellen Burton Harrington
The prolific periodical culture of the Victorian period produced a rich array of novels and stories, from the lengthy three‑deckers that Henry James famously called “loose, baggy monsters” to the more succinct novels of the end of the century. This class will consider a variety of novels and short stories, both popular and literary, that represent some of the significant political, social, racial, national, and gender undercurrents of the Victorian and Edwardian periods, along with historical and critical work that contextualizes it. We will begin with Charles Dickens’s Oliver Twist (1838), considering the novel’s classic portrayal of the orphan hero grappling with issues like class and crime. We’ll move to Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights (1847), reading the novel as a threshold text between the Romantic and the Victorian periods, and then we will examine George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss (1860) through its presentation of childhood and Victorian womanhood. Next, we will read Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone (1868) and consider class, crime, the critique of empire, and developing genres of popular fiction. We will read Stevenson’s novella The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) and consider crime and the city, developing theories of the mind, manhood, and the implications of Darwin. We will move to Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles (1891) to examine the tragic limitations of Tess’s class and gender positioning. Joseph Conrad’s Edwardian novel The Secret Agent (1906) is another threshold text, treating topical issues like anarchism and women’s rights in a novel that crosses genres, merging the political novel with the domestic novel and the detective novel.