English Course Offerings

The English Department's course offerings vary by semester. We offer 100-level composition courses, 200-level introductory courses, 300-level intermediate courses, 400-level advanced courses, and 500-level graduate courses. For a listing of everything in the departmental catalog, please visit:

http://www.southalabama.edu/bulletin/current/courses/english/index.html

For a listing of courses offered in a given semester, please visit PAWS. Enter the catalog term you wish to search and select "English" as the subject on the following page.


Spring 2018 Undergraduate Course Offerings


Introduction to Literary Study - EH 300 | Steve Trout
MWF, 2:30 pm to 3:20 pm

Required of all English majors, this course emphasizes vocabulary and reading and writing skills essential for success in 400-level literature classes. Drawn from the instructor's list of favorites, the required texts will include Ernest Hemingway's In Our Time, Willa Cather's A Lost Lady William Faulkner's Light in August, William Harmon's A Handbook to Literature, Thomas Foster's How to Read Literature Like a Professor, and The MLA Handbook (7th Edition). In addition, copies of selected short stories and poems will be distributed throughout the semester.


Shakespeare's Comedies and Romances - EH 322 | Richard Hillyer
MWF, 10:10 am to 11:00 am

We will study all of Shakespeare's romances and a representative selection of his comedies. Writing assignments will consist of two short papers (3-4 pages), a midterm, and a final. Our coverage of the romance Pericles will coincide with the production of it mounted by the USA theater department. Attendance at one of the performances is required: the final exam will demand familiarity with this production.


American Poetry before 1900 - EH 334 | Pat Cesarini
MWF, 12:20 pm to 1:10 pm

We will read longer selections by literary champs Walter ("Barbaric Yawp") Whitman and Emily ("Heavenly Hurt") Dickinson, interspersed with shorter rounds, answering questions like "When Is a Poet More Powerful than a Locomotive?" "When Is a Poem Like a Storm?" "What Do You Call a Cross Between an English and an Italian?" and "What Was Worse: the Civil War, or Civil War Poetry?" Plus more Dickinson, and more Whitman! You will do lots of counting to ten (more or less), following tenors to their vehicles, getting rhythm, pursuing words to their meanings in other words—and you will put it all together in several sharp, bright, elegantly-written essays.


Black Writers in America: Crime in African American Fiction - EH 357| Christopher Raczkowski
MWF, 1:25 pm to 2:15 pm

Arguably, crime has been central to African American literature from the moment the earliest slave narratives were authored by men and women for whom literacy itself was forbidden by law (and thus, for whom the very act of authorship was a crime). Given the continued legal and cultural criminalization of dark skin, it is not surprising that crime has remained a pervasive part of many of the African American authored texts we have come to consider central to the canon of American literature to the present: Cane, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Native Son, Invisible Man, Mumbo Jumbo and Beloved, to name a few.

This class will examine crime as a prevalent experience, theme, concept and plot device in 20th and 21st Century African American fictions ranging from the early twentieth-century Harlem Renaissance novels of Nella Larsen, Rudolph Fisher and Zora Neale Hurston, to the contemporary work of Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, Chris Abani and Percival Everett. Along the way, we will reflect on the various genre specific strategies utilized by black writers to represent crime in popular crime and detective, traditional literary, historical/documentary, and experimental novel forms.


British Novel since 1945 - EH 365 | Justin St. Clair
TR, 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm

EH 365 is a discussion-based course, the primary objective of which is to provide a broad overview of the British novel since 1945.  There are nine required primary texts in this course: George Orwell’s 1984 (1949), Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart (1958), John Fowles’s The French Lieutenant’s Woman (1969), Angela Carter’s Nights at the Circus (1984), Julian Barnes’s A History of the World in 10½ Chapters (1989), Salman Rushdie’s Haroun and the Sea of Stories (1990), Zadie Smith’s White Teeth (2000), Tom McCarthy’s Remainder (2005), and David Mitchell’s The Bone Clocks (2014).


Approaches to English Grammar - EH 371 | Larry Beason
MWF, 11:15 am to 12:05 pm

So what is a dangling participle anyway?  EH 371 offers students a valuable intellectual and practical skill: the ability to analyze and describe in technical terms how a given sentence is structured. While the course was originally developed for students planning to teach English at the secondary level, EH 371 is useful for just about anyone wanting to edit, write, analyze literary texts, teach non-native speakers of English, practice law, or learn more about the English language.


Technical Writing - EH 372 | Annmarie Guzy
Two sections:  MWF, 9:05 am to 9:55 am and MWF, 10:10 am to 11:00 am

The purpose of this course is to train students in the kinds of written reports required of practicing professionals, aiming to improve mastery of the whole process of report writing from conceptual stage through editing stage. This course will introduce you to types of written and oral communication used in workplace settings, with a focus on technical reporting and editing. Through several document cycles, you will develop skills in managing the organization, development, style, and visual format of various documents.


Technical Writing - EH 372 | Christine Norris
TR, 9:30 am to 10:45 am

In this class we will examine the practical, logistical, and ethical difficulties involved in communicating technical information to an audience. Students will have the opportunity to write technical documents for real clients and to work on technical documents relevant to their fields of study.


Writing in the Professions - EH 373 | Christine Norris
TR, 11:00 am to 12:15 pm

Writing in the Professions focuses on specialized writing training for professional, business, scientific, or technical fields. We will study how writing standards develop across disciplines and how technological advances are changing the rules of composing in various fields.


Science Fiction - EH 380 | Cris Hollingsworth
MWF, 11:15 am to 12:05 pm

We will approach science fiction as a way of thinking and of remaking the world. We will pay special attention to the symbolism and reality of the cyborg, which announces a mode of existence that mixes and redefines the meanings and relations between the biological and the mechanical, the actual and the simulated. We will read texts by authors such as Octavia Butler, Guy Debord, Samuel Delaney, Philip K. Dick, Donna Haraway, and H. G. Wells, and view several films. But we will also attend to our experience of everyday life, which is interpenetrated and increasingly defined by the continual arrival and incarnation of a host of competing futures.


Fiction Writing I/II - EH 391/392 | Nathan Poole
TR, 12:30 pm to 13:45 pm

An introductory and intermediate contemporary fiction seminar and writing workshop for undergraduates, emphasizing close reading, discussion, in-class writing, craft elements, play, experimentation, and the revision process.


Teaching Composition - EH 401 | Annmarie Guzy
MWF, 11:15 am to 12:05 pm

This course will introduce you to theories of composition and their applications for teaching writing at the secondary school level. In a seminar-style format, you will discuss the required texts and self-selected scholarly articles, learn and demonstrate various teaching techniques, and design a syllabus or detailed academic unit that is supported by a research-based rationale.


Rhetoric, Ancient and Modern - EH 402 | Patrick Shaw
TR, 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm

Beginning with the early sophists of Periclean Athens and ending in the twenty-first century, this course examines and compares various movements in the history of rhetoric, with particular emphasis on the relationship between rhetorical strategy and one’s image of human beings. The course aims to increase the scope of students’ understanding of rhetoric and help them apply this knowledge to their own communication and to their evaluation of the communications of others.


Literary Criticism since 1900 - EH 422 | Justin St. Clair
TR, 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm

The primary objective of EH 422 is to provide a broad overview of literary theory since 1900.  We will begin with various formalisms, wend our way through a succession of -isms, schisms, and camps, and finally conclude with a unit on cultural studies.  As we traverse topics ranging from deconstruction to psychoanalysis, from gender studies to post-colonial theory, we will develop a better understanding of the critical approaches literary scholars employ.


Medieval Lit: Medieval Journeys from Beowulf to Tolkien - EH 470 | John Halbrooks
TR, 11:00 am to 12:15 pm

Medieval narrative is often profoundly interested in travel, from religious pilgrimages (as in Chaucer), to knight errantry (as in the Arthurian romances), to spiritual journeys (as in Dante), to immigration (as in the Icelandic Sagas). This course will study travel and landscape as a major theme in the context of medieval "world building" and ecology. We will also consider the ways in which medieval models of travel and ecology continue to exert influence on modern (and postmodern) culture and literature, as manifested in writers like Tolkien (who was also a medieval scholar) and in film and television.


Studies in 19th Century Literature: The Literary Fairy Tale - EH 475 | Cris Hollingsworth
MWF, 10:10 am to 11:00 am

This course explores the complex and evolving matrix of connections between the literary fairy tale, nationalism, and individualism that marks the genre during the Romantic period and after. We will examine how the literary fairy tale evolved and prospered in Victorian culture, as well as the process and implications of its successful transplanting to the United States. After an introduction to the classic European fairy tale, we will study Lewis Carroll’s Alice books as an idiosyncratic challenge to the conventional fairy tale that becomes an exportable symbol of Britishness comparable to John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress. We will conclude by investigating the further evolution of the literary fairy tale at the hands of H. G. Wells and L. Frank Baum. The first "scientificizes" the literary fairy tale; the second, in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, "Americanizes" the European literary fairy tale in general and, in particular, Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures and Through the Looking-Glass.


Studies in Film: Adaptation - EH 478 | Becky McLaughlin
MW, 5:00 pm to 6:15 pm and M, 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm

The theme of this course is adaptation, and thus we will be watching films and reading the novels, short stories, or plays upon which they have been based. The two central and interrelated questions we will address are how and why screenplay writers and film directors choose to deviate from or align themselves with the original texts in the ways that they do. One of the major assignments in the class will be to write a short screenplay.


Advanced Fiction Writing I/II - EH 483/484 | Nathan Poole
R, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

A seminar, writing workshop, and directed-study for intermediate and experienced writers of fiction. Through tailored reading and writing projects students will work toward developing a greater understanding of the means and manners of fiction. Much of class time will be spent discussing peer work, literary models, and advanced technical concepts.


Advanced Poetry Writing I/II - EH 485/486 | Charlotte Pence
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This advanced poetry writing course continues the practices and studies in poetic craft began in earlier creative writing courses. Specifically, this course examines the state of the contemporary lyric and asks what are its craft elements that create what Auden defines poetry to be: "memorable speech." We will study a range of contemporary poets to understand not only how to shape our own experiences into poetry, but also how to understand our role within the lyrical tradition. To help us gain an understanding of this vibrant field, our class has the opportunity to meet guest poets this semester who include Jamaal May.

Since part of the writing process is the revision process, workshop will play a fundamental role in our course. Every week, we will submit poems to be workshopped. In workshop, students’ poems will be critiqued with the goal of a revised, polished manuscript presented by each writer at the semester’s end. A final portfolio of original poetry, a craft presentation, and attendance at literary events will constitute the course’s major requirements.


Screenwriting I - EH 487 | Adam Prince
TR, 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm

This class focuses on the fundamentals of screenwriting. We will study character development, conflict, structure, formatting, and so on as we explore how to write screenplays. Our focus will be as expansive as possible, covering drama, comedy, and action genres as well as both TV and feature-length scripts. Students will write at least one close analysis of a screenplay in addition to extensive work on an original TV pilot and a feature-length script. Screenplays will be workshopped in class and revised accordingly.


Special Topics: Visions of the Post-Apocalypse - EH 490 (H) | Larry Beason
MW, 1:25 pm to 2:40 pm

This is an Honors course that focuses on contemporary narratives of life after "the end of the world as we know it." The course examines not only traditional literary texts, but diverse mediums of recent popular culture (film, television, internet discourses, graphic novels, and video games). The course allows us to understand how post-apocalyptic narratives reflect and create messages that are relevant to our real-world fears and values. This is an Honors course and is normally available only to students officially enrolled in the USA Honors Program.


Spring 2018 Graduate Course Offerings


Introduction to Critical Theory - EH 501 | Christopher Raczkowski
T, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Required of all M.A. students in the Literature Concentration in their first year of work. Surveys current literary theory from structuralism to the present. The purpose is to introduce the conceptual lexicons and reading strategies of advanced literary analysis. Topics treated include structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, hermeneutics, Marxism, feminism, and reception theory.


Studies in Shakespeare I - EH 516 | Richard Hillyer
M, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

Beginning with The Tempest, we will study in reverse chronological order all of Shakespeare's romances and some of his comedies. Students will write a 20-25 page research paper based on one or more of the romances, and drawing, as needed, from the comedies for points of comparison. As this project builds to a conclusion, the USA theater department will be mounting a production of the romance Pericles. Attendance at one performance of this is required and will likely prove very helpful to the paper-in-progress.


Studies in Genre: Sherlock and the Detective Genre - EH 577 | Ellen Harrington
TR, 2:00 pm to 3:15 pm

Moving from the emergence of detective fiction in the work of Poe, Dickens, and Collins to the figure of Sherlock Holmes and his contemporaries to various iterations of the detective in fiction, film, and television in 20th and 21st centuries, this class will consider the enduring resonance of the figure of the detective. Readings include classic works by Poe, Dickens, and Doyle; Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd; Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon; Caspary’s Laura read alongside Collins’s classic The Woman in White and Preminger’s film of Laura; James’s An Unsuitable Job for a Woman; Hitchcock’s film Rear Window; Mosley’s Devil in a Blue Dress; and episodes from Moffat and Gattis’s BBC series Sherlock. We’ll consider formal aspects of the genre and its political, cultural, racial, and gender contexts framed in literary criticism and fan culture.


Graduate Fiction Writing I/II - EH 583/584 | Nathan Poole
R, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

A seminar, writing workshop, and directed-study for intermediate and experienced writers of fiction. Through tailored reading and writing projects students will work toward developing a greater understanding of the means and manners of fiction. Much of class time will be spent discussing peer work, literary models, and advanced technical concepts.


Graduate Poetry Writing I/II - EH 585/586 | Charlotte Pence
W, 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

This advanced poetry writing course continues the practices and studies in poetic craft began in earlier creative writing courses. Specifically, this course examines the state of the contemporary lyric and asks what are its craft elements that create what Auden defines poetry to be: "memorable speech." We will study a range of contemporary poets to understand not only how to shape our own experiences into poetry, but also how to understand our role within the lyrical tradition. To help us gain an understanding of this vibrant field, our class has the opportunity to meet guest poets this semester who include Jamaal May.

Since part of the writing process is the revision process, workshop will play a fundamental role in our course. Every week, we will submit poems to be workshopped. In workshop, students’ poems will be critiqued with the goal of a revised, polished manuscript presented by each writer at the semester’s end. A final portfolio of original poetry, a craft presentation, and attendance at literary events will constitute the course’s major requirements.


Special Topics: Screenwriting I - EH 590 | Adam Prince
TR, 3:30 pm to 4:45 pm

This class focuses on the fundamentals of screenwriting. We will study character development, conflict, structure, formatting, and so on as we explore how to write screenplays. Our focus will be as expansive as possible, covering drama, comedy, and action genres as well as both TV and feature-length scripts. Students will write at least one close analysis of a screenplay in addition to extensive work on an original TV pilot and a feature-length script. Screenplays will be workshopped in class and revised accordingly.


Seminar: Folklore and Listening - EH 592 | Kern Jackson
R, 5:00 pm to 7:30 pm

This course focuses on the collection of folklore and expressive culture. Analysis of oral narrative will provide a contemporary glimpse at collective memory in a specific time and place. Students are trained in ethnographic fieldwork methods, oral history interviewing techniques, transcription, and the evaluation of oral evidence.


Thesis Hours - EH 599

Please see Dr. Harrington if you would like to register for thesis hours and have not already discussed your committee, graduation requirements, etc.